Maria Coma Giner Red Sand

posted in: PHOTOGRAPHY | 0

Maria Coma Giner

Spain based photographer Maria Coma Giner started taking photographs at an early age as a way of self-expression. Studying photography and fine arts helped her develop her technical skills and she has since exhibited throughout Barcelona. In her latest project “Red Sand” she tries to express the small details of routine life, with ephemeral photographs, and the cruxes and the worries that they hide’, she explains. Most of her projects are sets of images and sequences with a meticulous attention to colors and forms. For more information check the interview below and visit her website www.mariacoma-photography.com

Maria Coma Giner

 How would you describe yourself in one sentence?
One sentence is not enough to describe myself or I would change the description every five minutes. I think a photograph can describe myself better.

Whom do you look up to?
I think that I spend more time searching artist from all the disciplines who inspire me than taking photos about my projects. I think it is really necessary to find the inspiration in other artists. Sometimes, even though I am not looking for it, I also find inspiration in my daily life and other projects. As a photographer, its difficult to invent something new but we can transform or evolve things. Coming back to the question, I have interests in lots of artists, even photographers. The most important artist for me is Egon Schiele. I really enjoy admiring his drawings . The ones that I really like are that ones that are a pencil sketch. Minimalist lines on paper.

Maria Coma Giner

Are there any personalities that have contributed to your successful career path?
For me, my environment is really important in my career. They are some people that increase my inspiration just with one word. Whose that value art and its meanings. But what is really surprising, even for me, it is that my mind increases its creativity and energy when I am in an uncomfortable zone. For example, when I don’t receive good news like winning a competition, or when I am not selected in an application. My first attitude is to feel down, but later I find my mind stronger and working better than ever.

How did your photographic career start?
My first difficulty was my family. I had to show to my parents that I really wanted to change my studies to become an artist. First, I began the Fine Arts degree where I realized that I wanted to become an artistic photographer. I used to paint, but this media wasn’t enough for me. I also began my photographic studies one year after that fine arts degree. Here is where I learnt about photography and how to express myself by taking pictures.

Maria Coma Giner

What was your favourite project and why?
Nowadays I try to enjoy my projects, because it’s not easy to find your style or place in this world. It’s funny, but the images that I really love from my archive aren’t as popular with the general public. I think it is because I know more from every shoot. I know the story in each capture and the reasons why I took it. I have more than one favourite, but one of them is the picture where there are hands holding a mountain of red sand.

What was the biggest challenge you’ve faced during your career as a photographer?
I think I keep working with some challenges. When I have to decide which light or aesthetic goes with my different ideas. Or if this image is better in BW or colour. But the most important challenge is to not let yourself be inlfuenced too much by the public.

How do you define creativity?
It’s a feeling. Fresh air and inspiration to create something, tell a story and let your feelings and concerns become real and material.

Maria Coma Giner

If you had one advice for someone seeking to live a creative life, what would you tell him?
Don’t pressure yourself. Try to enjoy your capacity and believe in your life style. It’s a hard decision. I had renounced from a normal job in order to spend my time working on my projects. 

What do you know now that you wish you knew at 21?
Sometimes I review my old projects or images and I am ashamed of myself for making technical mistakes. But I really think it’s important to have an evolution. Begin with a grain and finish with lots of it.

Is there anything for which you would be ready to give up your passion of photography?
It’s hard to think about it because it never happened in my shoes. I think that I can adapt my passion for photography in a lot of projects and jobs. It’s Something that benefits my mind and makes me be active and healthy. Even if I do not have a camera I would create images with objects, newspapers and old photograph.

Maria Coma Giner

Maria Coma Giner

Maria Coma Giner

Maria Coma Giner

Maria Coma Giner

Maria Coma GinerAll images © Maria Coma Giner

Leave a Reply